Comments for traceinthesand.com Blog http://traceinthesand.com/blog Musing about architecture, architecting and architects Sun, 09 Sep 2007 01:24:14 -0700 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.8.4 hourly 1 Comment on Agile Architecting by Ruth http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2007/09/08/agile-architecting/comment-page-1/#comment-2743 Ruth Sun, 09 Sep 2007 01:24:14 +0000 http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2007/09/08/agile-architecting/#comment-2743 Thanks Arnon! I had read, liked and learned from your Agile Architecture and Documentation post, so I'm very happy you caught my oversight! I really like that you're encouraging (agile) architects to document alternatives considered but ruled out and why. This may seem counter to the agile philosophy of minimalist documentation--there is pushback on documenting at all, so it'd be reasonable to ask why we should document approaches we decided against. But it is not counter to _being_ agile. It's not agile to revisit/rehash decisions, simply because... the collective "we" forgot, someone new came into the room, etc. Jeff Tyree and Art Ackerman's "Architecture Decisions: Demystifying Architecture" http://csdl2.computer.org/persagen/DLAbsToc.jsp?resourcePath=/dl/mags/so/&toc=comp/mags/so/2005/02/s2toc.xml&DOI=10.1109/MS.2005.27 also calls for documenting alternatives not chosen. Anshu Gaind has an architecture decision template that I also like because it explicitly identifies drawbacks of the approach, so that the discussion of downsides to our chosen approach is not swept off the table but rather addressed head on: http://www.bredemeyer.com/pdf_files/WhitePapers/Key%20Decisions%20Template.doc We also encourage architects to "connect the dots," tying decisions to their rationale--business strategy and architecture goals or lessons from our experience. The outcome of our thinking shows up in the code, but not the thought processes, the demands and drivers, the experiences, etc. that we were balancing as we made the architecture decisions. See http://www.bredemeyer.com/HotSpot/20040428EASoapBox.htm Thanks Arnon! I had read, liked and learned from your Agile Architecture and Documentation post, so I’m very happy you caught my oversight!

I really like that you’re encouraging (agile) architects to document alternatives considered but ruled out and why. This may seem counter to the agile philosophy of minimalist documentation–there is pushback on documenting at all, so it’d be reasonable to ask why we should document approaches we decided against. But it is not counter to _being_ agile. It’s not agile to revisit/rehash decisions, simply because… the collective “we” forgot, someone new came into the room, etc.

Jeff Tyree and Art Ackerman’s “Architecture Decisions: Demystifying Architecture” http://csdl2.computer.org/persagen/DLAbsToc.jsp?resourcePath=/dl/mags/so/&toc=comp/mags/so/2005/02/s2toc.xml&DOI=10.1109/MS.2005.27 also calls for documenting alternatives not chosen.

Anshu Gaind has an architecture decision template that I also like because it explicitly identifies drawbacks of the approach, so that the discussion of downsides to our chosen approach is not swept off the table but rather addressed head on: http://www.bredemeyer.com/pdf_files/WhitePapers/Key%20Decisions%20Template.doc

We also encourage architects to “connect the dots,” tying decisions to their rationale–business strategy and architecture goals or lessons from our experience. The outcome of our thinking shows up in the code, but not the thought processes, the demands and drivers, the experiences, etc. that we were balancing as we made the architecture decisions. See http://www.bredemeyer.com/HotSpot/20040428EASoapBox.htm

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Comment on Agile Architecting by Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2007/09/08/agile-architecting/comment-page-1/#comment-2736 Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz Sat, 08 Sep 2007 20:44:00 +0000 http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2007/09/08/agile-architecting/#comment-2736 Hi Ruth, I also blogged a few post on agile processes and architecture which you may find interesting. such as: http://www.rgoarchitects.com/nblog/2007/06/11/AgileArchitectureAndDocumentation.aspx http://www.rgoarchitects.com/nblog/2007/05/13/EvolvingArchitectures.aspx Hi Ruth,
I also blogged a few post on agile processes and architecture which you may find interesting. such as:

http://www.rgoarchitects.com/nblog/2007/06/11/AgileArchitectureAndDocumentation.aspx
http://www.rgoarchitects.com/nblog/2007/05/13/EvolvingArchitectures.aspx

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Comment on Architecture Documentation: Courage to Fly in the Face of Convention by A Trace in the Sand » Agile Architecting http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2006/08/25/architecture-documentation-courage-to-fly-in-the-face-of-convention/comment-page-1/#comment-2717 A Trace in the Sand » Agile Architecting Sat, 08 Sep 2007 12:30:56 +0000 http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2006/08/25/architecture-documentation-courage-to-fly-in-the-face-of-convention/#comment-2717 [...] Architecture Documentation: Courage to fly in the face of convention [...] [...] Architecture Documentation: Courage to fly in the face of convention [...]

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Comment on About Ruth Malan by A Trace in the Sand » Agile Architecting http://traceinthesand.com/blog/about/comment-page-1/#comment-2715 A Trace in the Sand » Agile Architecting Sat, 08 Sep 2007 12:21:57 +0000 #comment-2715 [...] About Ruth Malan [...] [...] About Ruth Malan [...]

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Comment on What is Software Architecture? by sanjib pandey http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2006/05/07/what-is-software-architecture/comment-page-1/#comment-165 sanjib pandey Thu, 01 Mar 2007 10:39:40 +0000 http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2006/05/07/what-is-software-architecture/#comment-165 Dear sir, i have am just starting with learning what is architecture… Want to grow as Software architectural consultant… I have some questions that need to be addressed 1. when some one have talent and can grow in any of the dimensions and he has not mention his designation and having good skill set of software architech, it is fair to reject any CV with out desination even he have exellent skill set. 2. What is need to now…to convince our CEO of our company.he is basically booky knowldge man and he could not get the point of tech knoeldge so please give good defination of s/w architec did he need desination give me suggestion, so that i can convince my CEO thanks Regards Sanjib Dear sir,
i have am just starting with learning what is architecture… Want to grow as Software architectural consultant…

I have some questions that need to be addressed

1. when some one have talent and can grow in any of the dimensions and he has not mention his designation and having good skill set of software architech, it is fair to reject any CV with out desination even he have exellent skill set.
2. What is need to now…to convince our CEO of our company.he is basically booky knowldge man and he could not get the point of tech knoeldge
so please give good defination of s/w architec did he need desination give me suggestion, so that i can convince my CEO
thanks
Regards
Sanjib

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Comment on That Vision Thing by John Wu http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2006/10/25/that-vision-thing/comment-page-1/#comment-107 John Wu Fri, 26 Jan 2007 19:42:55 +0000 http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2006/10/25/that-vision-thing/#comment-107 The link : http://e-cio.org/lea_book.htm http://blogs.ittoolbox.com/cio/lea/archives/distinguish-ea-from-business-transformation-8704 The link :

http://e-cio.org/lea_book.htm

http://blogs.ittoolbox.com/cio/lea/archives/distinguish-ea-from-business-transformation-8704

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Comment on That Vision Thing by John Wu http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2006/10/25/that-vision-thing/comment-page-1/#comment-106 John Wu Fri, 26 Jan 2007 19:40:40 +0000 http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2006/10/25/that-vision-thing/#comment-106 Ruth : This subject has been a hot topic in IT community. Cutter IT Journal recently call for paper on The CIO Today: Technology Manager or Strategic Visionary? The sad part is that EA get a long way to become mature, we are still at the stage to identify the direction. The good part is that we are lucky to be part of this evolution. In my openion, an Enterprise Architect is a facilitator as you said it means to honorably, responsibly, seek out the value that is compelling to our community, build a shared vision, build passion and commitment to attaining the vision, and lead the decisions and the action that realizes the vision. An entry in my blog have also touched this subject . Enclosed is the URL for your reference. The link : <a href="http://e-cio.org/lea_book.htm" rel="nofollow">http://e-cio.org/lea_book.htm</a> I have come up a book propsal in <a href="http://blogs.ittoolbox.com/cio/lea/archives/distinguish-ea-from-business-transformation-8704" rel="nofollow">http://blogs.ittoolbox.com/cio/lea/archives/distinguish-ea-from-business-transformation-8704</a> Please review and comment. Thanks. Ruth :

This subject has been a hot topic in IT community. Cutter IT Journal recently call for paper on The CIO Today: Technology Manager or Strategic Visionary? The sad part is that EA get a long way to become mature, we are still at the stage to identify the direction. The good part is that we are lucky to be part of this evolution.

In my openion, an Enterprise Architect is a facilitator as you said it means to honorably, responsibly, seek out the value that is compelling to our community, build a shared vision, build passion and commitment to attaining the vision, and lead the decisions and the action that realizes the vision.

An entry in my blog have also touched this subject . Enclosed is the URL for your reference.

The link :

http://e-cio.org/lea_book.htm

I have come up a book propsal in

http://blogs.ittoolbox.com/cio/lea/archives/distinguish-ea-from-business-transformation-8704

Please review and comment.

Thanks.

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Comment on That Vision Thing by Charlie Alfred http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2006/10/25/that-vision-thing/comment-page-1/#comment-51 Charlie Alfred Thu, 28 Dec 2006 11:54:10 +0000 http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2006/10/25/that-vision-thing/#comment-51 I agree 100%. Virtually all products and systems today have more complexity, and require deep knowledge of more subject matters, than one mind is able to master. Yet, a group of undirected experts is unlikely to create something that delivers great value. As an example, for the past 6 weeks, I've been working with a company which is in the planning stages for a next generation cardiac defibrillator/monitor. Even though this product replaces an existing 7 year old product, the vision and planning activities involve people from clinical, product marketing, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, software engineering, human factors, manufacturing, field sales, support, and finance. When we were first brought in, we conducted interviews with 24 different stakeholders. Interestingly, everyone was in full agreement that they needed to build a defibrillator/monitor, and everyone had a good appreciation for what that involved (most having done it several times before). However, the group's vision lacked alignment. The general manager had been pushing for a low cost unit. His boss felt that cost was important, but time to market was more important. The Marketing director knew that a major competitor had just introduced a new product and pushed for competitive features, especially in the area of hospital data management. In this particular case, I believe that a key to gaining alignment will be a financial model which illustrates the tradeoffs between a 1% change in market share vs. a $50 decrease in parts cost, vs. a 3 month delay in getting to market. Vision usually requires tradeoffs, and this means getting someone to loosen the grip on a perspective and belief system that they hold close to their hearts. BTW, 30 years ago, if I had any idea that my path as a software engineer, architect, and consultant would lead in this direction, I would have paid a lot more attention in psychology and sociology classes! Charlie I agree 100%. Virtually all products and systems today have more complexity, and require deep knowledge of more subject matters, than one mind is able to master. Yet, a group of undirected experts is unlikely to create something that delivers great value.

As an example, for the past 6 weeks, I’ve been working with a company which is in the planning stages for a next generation cardiac defibrillator/monitor. Even though this product replaces an existing 7 year old product, the vision and planning activities involve people from clinical, product marketing, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, software engineering, human factors, manufacturing, field sales, support, and finance.

When we were first brought in, we conducted interviews with 24 different stakeholders. Interestingly, everyone was in full agreement that they needed to build a defibrillator/monitor, and everyone had a good appreciation for what that involved (most having done it several times before). However, the group’s vision lacked alignment. The general manager had been pushing for a low cost unit. His boss felt that cost was important, but time to market was more important. The Marketing director knew that a major competitor had just introduced a new product and pushed for competitive features, especially in the area of hospital data management.

In this particular case, I believe that a key to gaining alignment will be a financial model which illustrates the tradeoffs between a 1% change in market share vs. a $50 decrease in parts cost, vs. a 3 month delay in getting to market. Vision usually requires tradeoffs, and this means getting someone to loosen the grip on a perspective and belief system that they hold close to their hearts.

BTW, 30 years ago, if I had any idea that my path as a software engineer, architect, and consultant would lead in this direction, I would have paid a lot more attention in psychology and sociology classes!

Charlie

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Comment on That Vision Thing by Ruth http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2006/10/25/that-vision-thing/comment-page-1/#comment-50 Ruth Wed, 27 Dec 2006 21:34:44 +0000 http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2006/10/25/that-vision-thing/#comment-50 Do you view architects as leaders? If so, leaders among which community? Leaders inspire and set direction. Early on, direction is set in terms of vision. So a leader needs to ensure that vision input is sought from key stakeholders, and that a vision is articulated, championed, and bought-into. A more specific answer begs more specific context. For example, if you mean the vision document for a product, then this is best created by the multi-functional team responsible for the product, led by that team's leader. The software architect may or may not be the team leader in this situation. But the software architect will lead on the software architecture vision that may be a component of the product vision, or may complement the product vision. Alternatively, if the architecture is for a product family (or software product line), then the architecture has a lifecycle of its own. This begins with vision, and the lead architect will be responsible for creating, selling, and sustaining the vision, with the help of others on the architecture team, and the extended team (future product marketing, key developers, etc.). Do you view architects as leaders? If so, leaders among which community?

Leaders inspire and set direction. Early on, direction is set in terms of vision. So a leader needs to ensure that vision input is sought from key stakeholders, and that a vision is articulated, championed, and bought-into.

A more specific answer begs more specific context. For example, if you mean the vision document for a product, then this is best created by the multi-functional team responsible for the product, led by that team’s leader. The software architect may or may not be the team leader in this situation. But the software architect will lead on the software architecture vision that may be a component of the product vision, or may complement the product vision.

Alternatively, if the architecture is for a product family (or software product line), then the architecture has a lifecycle of its own. This begins with vision, and the lead architect will be responsible for creating, selling, and sustaining the vision, with the help of others on the architecture team, and the extended team (future product marketing, key developers, etc.).

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Comment on That Vision Thing by dips http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2006/10/25/that-vision-thing/comment-page-1/#comment-42 dips Thu, 21 Dec 2006 12:28:32 +0000 http://traceinthesand.com/blog/2006/10/25/that-vision-thing/#comment-42 but still the question is answered.who is responsible for the vision document and how is the architect involved in it. but still the question is answered.who is responsible for the vision document and how is the architect involved in it.

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